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Gender based violence workshop for social work students

April 10, 2014

Social Work students from the School of Applied Human Sciences attended a gender based violence workshop presented by Ms Thenjiwe Manana of ZAZI and Mr Nhlanhla Vezi of Brothers For Life.

Ms Thenjiwe Manana of ZAZI and Mr Nhlanhla Vezi of Brothers For Life present to social work students.
Ms Thenjiwe Manana of ZAZI and Mr Nhlanhla Vezi of Brothers For Life present to social work students.
 
Social Work students from the School of Applied Human Sciences attended a gender based violence workshop presented by Ms Thenjiwe Manana of ZAZI and Mr Nhlanhla Vezi of Brothers For Life.

Students heard about the organisations and the role they play in the prevention and eradication of gender based violence.

Vezi spoke to students about the importance and need for safe male circumcision.  He also gave background on Brothers For Life, including what they stand for and the work that they did with male youth.

Manana of ZAZI - Nguni for know yourself,  explained that ZAZI was a new campaign aimed at women and girls under the leadership of the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) Women's Sector. The ZAZI Campaign encourages women and girls to draw on their inner strength, power, and self-confidence to know themselves and what they stand for in order to guide their decisions about their future.

The ZAZI campaign was developed by women for women and celebrates the strength of South African women. ZAZI is an Nguni word, meaning 'know yourself'.

‘We hope the campaign creates a movement that encourages women to defy the silence that allows the pain in their lives to thrive, to define their own values and their own path in life,’ said Manana.
 
Speaking to the students, Manana explained that the campaign planned to wok hard for women to have greater access to key services and commodities that can help stop new HIV infections and to prevent unwanted pregnancies through promoting dual protection and improving access to family planning.

She strongly advised students to prevent new HIV infections through promoting delaying sexual debut, partner reduction, increasing awareness of the risks of transactional intergenerational sex between older men and young women and multiple sexual partners; reducing alcohol and drug abuse and promoting the uptake of medical male circumcision.

Manana also shared a song, entitled ZAZI, written and performed by South African musician, Zonke, which showed situations where young women drew on their strength to make decisions for their own future.

The workshop was well attended and students expressed their interest by planning to follow the advice presented at the workshop.

Words and Pictures by Melissa Mungroo

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